• Deutsch
  • English
References

Alan Dargin (Australien):
“Perfekt”

“Woodslide – the Original”

A good 14 years ago I built the first slide didgeridoos which I named “Woodslide”.

This slide didge was meant to appeal to professional musicians and ambitious recreational musicians who often play together with other musicians, and this slide could quickly enable them to exactly tune to the other instruments.

These instruments are elaborately fashioned into perfectly shaped sound vessels made of precious wood (this is processed from one piece – only heart wood – namely neither cut in half and glued together again nor made on a lathe, etc.) combined with a high-tech insert made of anodised aluminium. This special slide mechanism was continually further developed over a long period of time and improved, and it has been perfected for many years now.

The insert tube of the slide mechanism is permanently elastically connected with the wooden body of the didgeridoo, so that these two different materials perfectly harmonise with each other. Two or three seconds after moving the tube the slide mechanism starts to grip more strongly thanks to rubber rings, in order to prevent an unwanted moving during playing. However, for musicians who want to quickly change the key while playing (sliding), smaller rubber rings can be inserted.

With its slide area the “Woodslide” opens up completely new sound and playing dimensions, which are unique in terms of their spectrum! Depending on the basic tone they are built for, they facilitate a range of up to six halftones for the musician.
These instruments can be very easily tuned to every other instrument within seconds, and can hence be immediately used to play music together with other musicians. In terms of their sound the “Original Woodslide” didgeridoos are even far better than good eucalyptus didges! Because of their almost perfect shapes they have a very clear, pure sound, with rich overtones. The combination of wood and metal does not have any negative effects that deteriorate the acoustic pattern if the sound vessel wood has the right length ratio to the metal. Roughly speaking, if I build a didge with a length of 1 meter and a tube extension of 1 meter, then I would admittedly have a huge range of tones, but the sound would be awful.

AtentionUnfortunately another didgeridoo maker has started using my name “Woodslide”. In terms of craftsmanship these didges neither have the playability nor the sound or function to match my high standard, which I achieved through hard work over a period of several years. I would like to clearly and explicitly distance myself from such didges!